It is Not Yet Madaraka for Kenya: ‘Let My People Go…’

Kenyan flag

Fifty-seven years ago, Kenyans first celebrated their hard-won independence from British rule. Certainly, this never came easy. It came at a great price. Many freedom fighters lost their lives, their all; and some lived to tell of the tortured, imprisonments, and injustices inflicted against them and their families. Madaraka Day is a time to pause and remember their exemplary sacrifices, their fighting spirit for a free and united Kenya, and their heroic courage. It happens that many of them never made to our history books.

The dawn of an independent Kenya must have been an ecstatic experience. Kenyans, at the time of independence, must have been thrilled to realize that the oppressive colonial rule had finally come to an end. They cried tears of joy in disbelieve; knowing that the new dawn was coming with future possibilities and promise. Indeed, it was a sundown for the colonial rule, but a sunrise for indigenous rule.

The optimism and aspirations of the generations of Kenyans at independence were articulated in the national anthem. The pioneering Kenyans at independence anticipated a nation that would be characterized by blessings and plenty. They envisioned a nation that upholds the ideals of justice, peace, unity, and liberty. They idealized these values as the foundation of a prosperous Kenya. They recognized that realization of this dream will take concerted efforts, each Kenyan involved. Presumably, each time they sang and prayed the words of the national anthem they challenged themselves to arise and build the envisioned Kenya as one people. They envisioned a brighter future against the backdrop of illiteracy, widespread poverty, and a small economy.

From the national anthem, the generation of Kenya at independence KNEW the meaning of the colors of the Kenyan flag. They knew what we have forgotten. They knew what they formerly fought for. They knew what the new Kenya should look like. They knew what they should expect from the Kenyan-ruled governments. They simply had a vision and a clear knowledge of the path for their future.

From the national anthem, the generation of Kenya at independence KNEW the meaning of the colors of the Kenyan flag. They knew what we have forgotten. They knew what they formerly fought for. They knew what the new Kenya should look like. They knew what they should expect from the Kenyan-ruled governments. They simply had a vision and a clear knowledge of the path for their future.

The Great Let Down

Sadly, the joy of independence was short-lived as people realized that the new African leaders were no different from the colonizers. As a result, the people felt a sense of betrayal; their hopes were crushed. The enemy was no longer “them.” Rather, the new, hard-to-deal-with enemy became one of “us.” After the white colonizers exited, the black colonizers took over and continued the colonization. The people who were entrusted leadership position became less and less interested in furthering the vision of the ‘Kenyan kingdom;’ instead, they became passionate in establishing and flourishing their own kingdoms of self, power, and wealth. During the ensuing years, politics of vengeance, deception, hatred, and exclusion became a new norm. Apparently, this has continued, even into our times, to characterize the political landscape in Kenya. Greed, injustices, corruption, violence, and tribalism became normalized in land allotment and distribution, occupation of public offices, distribution of public resources, and so forth. As a result, the divide between the poor and the rich has continued to increase.

As Kenyans Mark Fifty-Seven years of Independence

Fifty-seven years later, admittedly, the post-independent Kenya has made some strides in different sectors of economy. However, Kenya largely continues to struggle to remain true to her dream. The fight against theft of public resources is not yet won; the politics of betrayal, deception and exclusion continues unchallenged. So, where is the problem?

Approximately 3000 years ago, the biblical Moses was called to deliver the people of Israel from the then oppressive Egyptian regimes. The nature of his liberation was all-encompassing; his liberation call “Let my people Go” was spiritual, social, economic, and political. He was to liberate the people to be free to worship, free to rule themselves, free to work to build their own economy, and free to be a people with a distinct identity, purpose and destiny. Moses, as a skilled architect, laid a moral foundation as the pillar for the social, economic and political prosperity of the nation. The moral compass, founded on the God-given Law, became the constitution and basis of reference for leaders occupying any public office. It became the basis of social justice. Moses’ successor Joshua, as a faithful leader and steward, transitioned the nation to their Promised land and fairly allotted the Promised land to the people. As a faithful leader, he never (ab)used the leadership position to amass wealth. Rather, he used it as a trust, and tool for service. In my opinion, one of the main problems that Kenya has faced since independence, can be identified as failed leadership. The elected leaders have always failed to be faithful to the trust given to them. The type of the leaders “we” elect make it hard for Kenya to realize her dream.

Fifty-seven years later after official independence, the truth remains that the Kenyan people, like citizens in many other African states, still need to be liberated from the bondage of heavy taxation, hopelessness, violence, police brutality, tyrannical leadership, plunder of public resources and from the suffering of the people. Other than doing our part in the building of the nation, we can only HOPE that someday God will raise a Moses and a Joshua for our country, to deliver the people and to bring them into a land of abundance; a land where justice, unity, and peace are celebrated.

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