Rethinking the Way Church Ministries are Funded

Photocredit: BusinessDaily

Giving is a biblical requirement for believers in Christ. It is to be done generously and joyfully, out of a heart that is grateful to God. Biblically, it is a blessing to give than to receive.

It is through giving that the work of God is propagated; for instance, preaching of the gospel, and planting of churches. Also, it is through giving, God involves people in doing his work of spreading the gospel and transforming lives and communities. The generosity of God’s people enables churches to fulfill their financial obligations like paying salaries and meeting other administrative costs. Again, it is through giving that the needs of the poor, the sick, and the vulnerable are met. Most of the churches in Kenya rely on Sunday collections to fund these financial duties and operations. (How sustainable is this?)

A few months ago, when the Covid-19 pandemic was first reported in Kenya, Sunday gatherings were halted as a containment measure against the spread of the coronavirus. Many churches have been hit hard by this measure, Also, it is true that due to the ongoing uncertain situation, many church members have lost jobs, and others have had to take pay-cuts. As a result, many churches are experiencing a financial shock. The few available resources cannot address the increasing needs within and outside the church.

The outcome of a recently released poll by ShahidiHub Africa indicate that 37.53% of pastors/church leaders think that Giving is down at least 50%; also, 23.08% mentioned that Giving is down at least 25 %; 29.14% said that Giving is down below 10%; while 6.99% think that giving is close to the same. However small the percentage, it is interesting to note that 3.26% said that giving is up more than usual. The report further indicates that “Overall, 85% think that giving is below 50%. This significantly impairs the functioning of church activities.” When the church does not have financial resources, it makes it hard to sustain itself as an organization, and in reaching out to the needs in the surrounding society.

Evidently, the financial constraints occasioned by the Covid-19 pandemic, that has affected the majority of churches in Kenya, is an indicator that churches might need to relook at their revenue base with the intention of expanding it. Churches may want to consider financial sustainability models that do not wholly depend on Sunday collections to run church operations. Clearly, over-reliance on Sunday morning collections weakens the church’s ability to meet its financial obligations, and ministries to the poor and underprivileged in the society.

It is worth noting that some churches have invested in income-generating activities to boost their income base. This enables them to build reserves for church operations for unusual moments. My first proposition is that churches that have not invested in income-generating activities should consider this option in the post-COVID period. It is important to note that the management of these investments needs to be handled with care and prudence so that it does not overshadow the very purpose of the church. These projects should only facilitate the mission of the church.

Second, the church needs to be intentional in matters of holistic ministry. The breakout of the Covid-19 pandemic is a reminder of a need not just to preach a spiritual message to our congregations, but also help improve their economic status by equipping them with business skills for self-support. If we want to have churches that are financially stable, we will need to equip our members to be strong economically; a wealthy home will possibly mean a wealthier church. Covid-19 pandemic should thus cause leaders to rethink how their churches can remain financially stable to continue its mission even in uncertain times.

GUEST CONTRIBUTOR:

Philemon K. Tanui,
Associate Pastor, A. I. C Wilson Airport (Nairobi)- Dip. Bible and Pastoral Studies (2007), B.Th (2011), MA Missions (2018), Ph.D Student (A.I.U)

Philemon K. Tanui

One thought on “Rethinking the Way Church Ministries are Funded”

  1. Well said, Pastor Tanui, there was a news item that showed that even pastors have been affected significantly and resulted in buying and selling merchandise to put food on the table for their families. It was so sad and showed how the church and her activities are vulnerable in time of crisis. I support the idea of other means of sustaining the church.. probably in times of plenty funds investment policies with insurance companies can be also be explored.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s